Black Big Clipper Ship Nautical Standard Size Pillowcase

Royalkane

$14.95 

From our Original Art Series of LOVES VINTAGE NAUTICAL
comes the highly sought after design, The Vintage Clipper Ship at Sea. You can almost smell the salt air seeing this old ship from long ago in this timeless print. Awesome 3-D effect, looks like the ship's coming at ya! So vintage and retro, your guests will be so amazed at it's brilliance! Our Royal Kane Exclusive Art will adorn your favorite Nautical Room and cannot be found anywhere else! Completes the ocean decor in your room or makes the perfect gift!

This auction is for the pillowcase only; Fits perfectly standard-sized pillowcases, 200 thread count percale, hotel quality-made to LAST!
50% cotton, 50% polyester , Durable for heavy washing
Single pick yarn, snow white: Dimensions: 20" x 30"

You will get so many compliments of warm goodness. We only sell gorgeous designs. Our piilowcase designs make otherwise mundane and ordinary pillows EXTRAORDINARY! This is a Royal Kane Original Design, can't be found anywhere else on the planet.

The term "clipper" most likely derives from the verb "clip", which in former times meant, among other things, to run or fly swiftly. Dryden, the English poet, used the word "clip" to describe the swift flight of a falcon in the 17th century when he said "And, with her eagerness the quarry missed, Straight flies at check, and clips it down the wind." The ships appeared to clip along the ocean water. The term "clip" became synonymous with "speed" and was also applied to fast horses and sailing ships. "To clip it," and "going at a good clip," are familiar expressions to this day.
While the first application of the term "clipper" in a nautical sense is by no means certain, it seems to have had an American origin when applied to the Baltimore clippers of the late 18th century. When these vessels of a new model were built, which were intended to "clip" over the waves rather than plough through them, the improved type of craft became known as "clippers" because of their speed.
In England the nautical term "clipper" appeared a little later. The Oxford English Dictionary says its earliest quotation for "clipper" is from 1830. This does not mean, however, that little British opium clippers from prior to 1830 were not called "opium clippers" just as they are today. Carl C. Cutler reports the first newspaper appearance was in 1835, and by then the term was apparently familiar. An undated painting of the British Water Witch built in 1831 is labeled OPIUM CLIPPER "WATER WITCH" so the term had at least passed into common usage during the time that this ship sailed.



*All pillowcases and printing may vary ever so slightly from what is shown, as you are supporting local artists who do everything old school by hand. We'll even sprinkle in a little love for free.


We at Royal Kane always display our own designs, as we won't design them unless they're awesome enough for us.
Makes the best gift around!

BRAND NEW and hot off the silk screen press.