Pillow Fight Set of fighting CENTAUR vs GRIFFIN pillowcases

Royalkane

$27.95 

From our Original Art Series of PILLOW FIGHTING
comes the highly sought after design, Centaur Vs. Griffin!

Be sure to check out all our different designs in our PILLOW FIGHTING section, new designs added daily!

What an ART statement to have these dueling pillowcases adorn your bed! Makes the GREATEST conversation piece! Age Old Battle- 2 fierce mythological creatures, ready to cut lose, in this perfect play-on-words PILLOW FIGHT, ready to fight for their life! These pillows hilariously welcome you to pick them up and start fighting each other with them :-)

These moving ART pieces make THE most original and unique gift!

One of the only gifts that could look so sophisticated and swanky in an adults room, yet would look so cool and fun in a kid's room too!

What to get for the one who has everything or is too hard to shop for? These are the PERFECT gift, and since they are our original designs, they cannot be found anywhere else!

These pillowcases will fit any decor and be the greatest centerpiece of a room!

These pillowcases are also great for a gift shop or store as you can see exactly what you're getting on the label on the display front detailing it's contents! Please inquire about bulk discounts for larger orders. Our © PILLOW FIGHTING pillowcases


This listing is for the 2 pillowcases only; About the pillowcase:
Fits perfectly standard / queen sized pillowcases,
200 thread count percale, hotel quality-made to LAST!
60% cotton, 40% polyester , Durable for heavy washing
Single pick yarn, snow white: Dimensions: 20" x 30"
Made In The USA
You will get so many compliments of warm goodness. We only sell awesome designs. Our pillowcase designs make otherwise mundane and ordinary pillows EXTRAORDINARY! This is a Royal Kane Original Design, can't be found anywhere else on the planet.

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ABOUT THE CENTAUR:

Centaur
"Sintar" redirects here. For the Romanian village, see Bogda.
Centaur
(Kentaur, Κένταυρος, Centaurus)
Centaure Malmaison crop.jpg
A bronze statue of a centaur,
after the Furietti Centaurs.
Grouping Legendary creature
Sub grouping Hybrid
Similar creatures Minotaur, satyr, harpy
Mythology Greek
Region Greece
Habitat Land

A centaur (/ˈsɛntɔːr/; Greek: Κένταυρος, Kéntauros, Latin: centaurus) or hippocentau is a mythological creature with the head, arms, and torso of a human and the body and legs of a horse.

The centaurs were usually said to have been born of Ixion and Nephele (the cloud made in the image of Hera). Another version, however, makes them children of a certain Centaurus, who mated with the Magnesian mares. This Centaurus was either himself the son of Ixion and Nephele (inserting an additional generation) or of Apollo and Stilbe, daughter of the river god Peneus. In the later version of the story his twin brother was Lapithes, ancestor of the Lapiths, thus making the two warring peoples cousins.

Centaurs were said to have inhabited the region of Magnesia and Mount Pelion in Thessaly, the Foloi oak forest in Elis, and the Malean peninsula in southern Laconia. They continued to feature in literary forms of Roman mythology. A pair of them draw the chariot of Constantine the Great and his family in the Great Cameo of Constantine[clarification needed] (c314-16), which embodies wholly pagan imagery.

In J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series, centaurs live in the Forbidden Forest close to Hogwarts, preferring to avoid contact with humans. Although different from those seen in Narnia, they live in societies called herds and are skilled at archery, healing and astrology. Although film depictions include very animalistic facial features, the reaction of the Hogwarts girls to Firenze suggests a more classical appearance.

With the exception of Chiron, the centaurs in Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson & the Olympians are seen as party-goers who use a lot of American slang. Chiron is more like the classical centaurs, being trainer of the heroes and skilled in archery. In Riordan's subsequent series, Heroes of Olympus, another group of centaurs are depicted with more animalistic features (such as horns) and appear as villains, serving the Gigantes.

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ABOUT THE GRIFFIN:

Griffin
(griffon, gryphon)
Knossos fresco in throne palace.JPG
Griffin fresco in the "Throne Room", Palace of Knossos, Crete, Bronze Age
Grouping Mythological hybrids
Similar creatures Simurgh, Sphinx
Mythology Eurasian and Ancient Egyptian

Achaemenid griffin at Persepolis.

The Islamic Pisa Griffin, in the Pisa Cathedral Museum
The griffin, griffon, or gryphon (Greek: γρύφων, grýphōn, or γρύπων, grýpōn, early form γρύψ, grýps; Latin: gryphus) is a legendary creature with the body, tail, and back legs of a lion; the head and wings of an eagle; and an eagle's talons as its front feet. Because the lion was traditionally considered the king of the beasts and the eagle the king of birds, the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature. The griffin was also thought of as king of all creatures. Griffins are known for guarding treasure and priceless possessions. Adrienne Mayor, a classical folklorist, proposes that the griffin was an ancient misconception derived from the fossilized remains of the Protoceratops found in gold mines in the Altai mountains of Scythia, in present day southeastern Kazakhstan, or in Mongolia. In antiquity it was a symbol of divine power and a guardian of the divine.


Form
Most statues have bird-like talons, although in some older illustrations griffins have a lion's forelimbs; they generally have a lion's hindquarters. Its eagle's head is conventionally given prominent ears; these are sometimes described as the lion's ears, but are often elongated (more like a horse's), and are sometimes feathered.

Infrequently, a griffin is portrayed without wings, or a wingless eagle-headed lion is identified as a griffin. In 15th-century and later heraldry such a beast may be called an alce or a keythong.

In heraldry, a griffin always has forelegs like an eagle's hind-legs. A type of griffin with the four legs of a lion was distinguished by perhaps only one English herald of later heraldry as the Opinicus where it also had a camel-like neck and a short tail that almost resembles a camel's tail.

While griffins are most common in the art and lore of Ancient Greece, there is evidence of representations of griffins in Ancient Persian and Ancient Egyptian art dating back to before 3000 BC.[5] In Egypt, a griffin can be seen in a cosmetic palette from Hierakonpolis, known as the "Two Dog Palette",[6][7] which is dated to ca. 3300-3100 BC.[8] In Persia, griffins appeared on cylinder seals from Susa as early as 3000 BC.[9] Griffin depictions appear in the Levant, Syria, and Anatolia in the Middle Bronze Age,[10][11] dated at about 1950-1550 BC.[12] Early depictions of griffins in Ancient Greek art are found in the 15th century BC frescoes in the Throne Room of the Bronze Age Palace of Knossos, as restored by Sir Arthur Evans. It continued being a favored decorative theme in Archaic and Classical Greek art.

In The Son of Neptune by Rick Riordan, Percy Jackson, Hazel Levesque, and Frank Zhang are attacked by griffins in Alaska.

In the Harry Potter series, the character Albus Dumbledore has a griffin-shaped knocker. Also, the character Godric Gryffindor's surname is a variation on the French griffon d'or ("golden griffon").

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